EXPERIMENT

FOR OUR SPECIFIC EXPERIMENT–SEE “THE EXPERIMENT” UNDER MENU IN THE UPPER RIGHT HAND CORNER OF THE HOME PAGE. Place a droplet of water on a surface and it will bunch up, take on the shape of a half sphere. That’s because water molecules are cohesive, partly meaning they have high surface tension in air. The water …

SIZE

    In my investigation of what space is and how it differs from the dimension of time—or not—I came up against something that should look strange to most of us, but that is taken in stride. Namely, the size of things.   Coming back from Vegas through all of the beautiful, yet never-ending desert, …

Anniversary Post/Summary

    This post is for those who, for whatever reason, through the Facebook platform decided to congratulate Union of Opposites website on its one-year anniversary.   On this site, we posit that there exists an Implicit World (Bohm’s Implicit (see Wholeness And The Implicit Order) a WIBWI: What Is Behind What Is), a nondescript …

How long? How far?

One of the mysteries I’m trying to answer for myself is about the difference in measuring space and time.

Leading from my experiment on how an expanding droplet “learns to see” space and time, I will attempt to connect the concept to our own experiences of space and time.

For primitive boundaries how long in duration something lasts (the number of samples between actually sampling the target configuration (primitive sequential recognition) feeds into the “growth” of time.

The radius and circumference of boundary expansion is synonymous with the likelihood of sampling a configuration or statistical distribution.

Who Are We?

Where did we come from?

How did we form?

And what will become of us?

Strange that a little droplet of water expanding into sluggish oil should give us some insights into ourselves, into our birth, life, and death. Here goes:

Before our droplet can change shape, before information can cross its boundary and endure as a change in that boundary, there must be a 100% probable Here and Now for it to sample. But, for man or droplet, such does not exist at this early stage. Nothing makes sense–there is no recognizable sequence in the samples.

We’re starting with one puzzle piece of information, and nothing we’re sampling connects up to it. That’s what making sense (also making space and time) looks like. Our system must first sample possible locations to create the sequence of locations we call space. Our system must sample sequences of logical next steps to create its own time. It must sample its environment at regular intervals in order to become aware of its own duration. (The natural vibrational frequencies of tuning forks are good examples of a regular sampling rate at a boundary.)

The only boundary configuration that works for longterm thought and memory is complex. One might think of it as the product of the natural selection of creating duration in space and time. At first our droplet’s boundary is too curved to interact, then it becomes so flat that random perturbations from its environment can change it, but the changes will not endure. Only when boundary shapes change for good can sequences in space and time form. The experiment ends when again the boundary becomes so curved no new information can be acquired and the droplet can no longer respond to its environment. We would no longer be aware of our existence.

Next, we’ll explore how similar is the birth, life, and death of the human brain and how, as a complex system, its end might differ from the droplet’s.